Dec
01
2017

Tomato Variety Reference Page

This page is of pictures and descriptions of tomatoes for sale at one time here. Some may be grown again and others not.
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ABC Potato Leaf POT tomABC
This a dwarf potato leaf cherry. They taste like regular cherry tomatoes. This is a good variety for pots. The photo of the ripe cherry does not show my hand. I somehow forgot to take a pic! This photo is from my friend Nina who I gave plant to. She is very petite so in her hand the cherry looks deceptively larger.
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Adventure tomAdv
I received seed for this variety from my friend Randy out in Iowa. It is a productive round red. Great for those who want a “normal” perfect looking tomato. Googling for info on this variety is extremely difficult since so many sites that are not relevant show up, and I think that may be partly why this variety is relatively unknown.
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African Queen tomAQu
This variety is a heirloom form North Carolina. My friend Rob, an amazing tomato grower, grew this variety in 2012, and I really liked it. It also happened to coincidentally be the 100 year anniversary of the African Queen Boat being built. It was restored in 2012, and my father rebuilt the green engine, pictured here, getting it back in working condition as part of the restoration. I of course had to grow the tomato! It is a tasty pink beefsteak with good production. Potato leaf.
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Amazing Grace Cherry tomAGra
I know many of you have seen this tomato and were waiting for it. It is large bi-color cherry, golden yellow with a small red blush, and it has excellent flavor. It is the best bi-color cherry I’ve had. So I wrote to my friend that I received seeds from as to the history of this tomato. Well, the fruit was suppose to be a beefsteak. As she wrote to me, “Bill Malin gave me what he thought was Quedlingburger Frühe Liebe, but when I grew it out, it was a giant bicolor beefsteak with potato leaves. He said I should just give it my own name, because it really is a very tasty tomato and one of the only compact indeterminate bicolor beefsteaks out there. I named it after my cat, Grace, grew it out 3 more times, and then distributed it.”
Well, I, as you can see, ended up with a cherry, and a fantastic cherry. But this seed must be grown out to become stable. I think it is worth the effort.
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Andrina tomAndr
This little cutie came my way via my tomato friend Randy out in Iowa. The plants are very small, just a little bigger than Micro Tom. I somehow missed taking a pic of my plants. The plants produce fruit very quickly. The tomatoes are strong flavored. This variety is originally from Russia.
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Anna Russian tomAnnR
This is a popular heirloom heart shaped pink tomato. As with many hearts, I find it sweet. Also as with many hearts, the foliage is very wispy. It can make you think there’s something wrong with the plants, but they do just fine with thin leaves. I’ve never been happy with production of this variety. It just doesn’t perform well for me despite growing it a few times.
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Aunt Gertie’s Gold tomAGG
This Virginia heirloom is quite tasty. It is a favorite beefsteak of many. Unfortunately for us northern growers it is quite late to ripen. It is also stingy with its fruit which I suspect is not a problem in more southerly locations. I have a local friend that loves it so much she is willing to put up with these faults. I on the other hand am not so forgiving. The fruits average about a l lb. but can get quite big with care. There is northern customer that started plants early and set out sizable plants. They did get an earlier and more productive harvest. Maybe that is the trick for this variety? Potato leaf.
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Azoychka tomAzo
This small lemon yellow(the color in the photo is a tad dark) beefsteak is reliably early for me. I love it for that reason. It is also quite zippy tasting for a yellow. I used to have the wrong assumption that yellows were boring tasting, not so! This variety comes originally from Russia.
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Beauty King tomBK
This is an extremely pretty tomato with its red and yellow striping. I remember the first time I saw it at the CHOPTAG party I attended, I was wowed by its looks. It is a sport or cross from Big Rainbow that was found and developed for the best striping by Brad Gates some time ago. It is assertive in flavor which is the opposite of Big Rainbow’s blandness. It is a late variety, I do not recommended it for short season growers. I won’t be growing it again.
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Believe It Or Not tomBION
If you are looking for good looking and good tasting red beefsteak tomatoes, this is definitely one to try. I do not grow for size, but the fruit can get very big if well tended. The true origins of this variety are unknown, but it is an older OP as it was first listed in the SSE yearbook in 1984.
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Belmonte tomBelm
This variety is a favorite of my good tomato growing friend Rob K. They do grow well here with lots of fruit as you can see in the plant photo. They are an Italian heirloom. They are variable in shape, this one often has an elongated neck so it is more of a bell/Bartlett pear shape. Click here to see a a display of them in Italy. *There seems to be another Belmonte circulating around that is a pink beefsteak type. This is NOT that tomato.* This Belmonte originated from seeds straight from an Italian company. Because of the unusual shape, I thought this Belomnte was in the piriform/large pear group of tomatoes. After reading more in Italian, they seem to describe it as a Oxheart-Marmande type cross which would explain the variable shape with ribbing. They are meaty and good for canning, but not as dry as pastes so good for fresh eating too.
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Berkeley Tie Dye tomBTD
This is an unusual looking tomato. It was developed by my Tomatoville friend, Brad Gates of Wild Boar Farms. Some find it very attractive. At first I found it hard to tell when to pick, but I realized it is like a green when ripe tomato dressed up in a crazy suit. If you wait too long for other coloration to appear, it will be over ripe. It is a juicy tomato with excellent flavor.
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tomato blakc seamanBlack Sea Man tomBSM
After a couple years of growing wrong versions of this, I finally got the correct one! This is a determinate plant with potato leaf foliage. The plants are 3-4′ tall. The dark fruits are variable in shape but mostly look like small beefsteaks, and they are tasty. This is Russian cultivar. ‘Chernomor’ is probably the same variety as it is also from Russia and translates to Black Sea Man.
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Blue Ridge Mountain tomBRM
With so many varieties to try, I chose this one to grow like I did Alleghany Sunset. One of the most beautiful sites I’ve ever seen is driving through the Blue Ridge Mountains in the spring when the Redbuds are in bloom and shrubs with white blossoms are too. It is breathtaking. The flavor of this tomato makes it deserving of its name. Is a very tasty pink beefsteak with potato leaves in the same line of flavor as Brandywine or Prudens Purple. It wasn’t overly productive, but they did come in a timely fashion, and the amount is still better than Brandywine.
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BrandyFred tomBrF
This Dwarf Tomato Project cultivar “originated with a cross made between Dwarf Wild Fred and Brandywine by Vince Lavallo in 2008 and named Tasty. BrandyFred was selected and named by Vince. The vigorous potato leaf dwarf plant produces very good yields of smooth oblate purple (clear skinned black) fruit that range between 10-16 ounces, possessing a rich, well balanced delicious flavor. Involved are Vince Lavallo, Linda Black, Craig LeHoullier, Robbins Hail, Bill Yoder, Richard Watson, Patrick Sullivan, Sandra Tipton, and Shawn Conant.”
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Carmella’s Yellow Stripes tomCYS
This is a heirloom that I received down in Berea, KY at the seed swap/sale at the Sustainable Mountain Agriculture Center run by Bill Best. (Bill just had a book about Seeds published this year, Saving Seeds, Preserving Taste The swap held the first Sat. in Oct. every year is worth attending if you are in driving distance. Anyway, I had to grow Carmella’s Yellow Stripes as Carmella was my grandma’s name. The fruit is a very pretty red and yellow bicolor. It wasn’t overly productive this year (2013,) but of course the weather was not that great so quite a few varieties were lower that expected. I would assume in a normal warm year, production would be higher.
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Cero Blackburn tomCero
This is a big super meaty orange tomato. When searching for info about this variety, all I came up with was the obituary for Cero Blackburn of Pike County, KY. As I received this variety in Berea, he was probably the source of this cultivar.
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Chapman tomChap
This is an attractive big red beefsteak tomato. The flavor is yummy. This tomato originally came from Maine. It was early for its size so definitely a good one for the northern garden. After having grown this variety twice, I have to say is not the most productive tomato in mid-summer heat. So high heat areas may be disappointed with this tomato. Those of you in cool summer coastal areas will love this one.
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Cherokee Green Grape POTtomCGGrap
This variety has made its appearance at the Buffalo~Niagara Tomato Tastefest every year courtesy of tomato grower/breeder and co-founder of the TasteFest, Mark Korney. He bred this variety. It is very cute looking, and I finally decided to grow it. The fruit are good sized grape shaped cherry tomatoes. They develop a strong amber blush when ripe, but unlike the larger Cherokee counterparts, they do not start to deteriorate. So you can pick them and keep them for a few days. They are a sweet variety. Plants are productive small determinates.
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Chyornyi Prince aka Black Prince tomCPrinc
I was lucky enough to get the seed of this straight from the Ukraine with an actual seed packet(photo to the left.) The dark fruit of this variety vary in size from small globes to almost baseball size. The plants are fairly productive starting early mid season to frost. They were not my favorite in flavor, but it is popular with many growers so there are many who disagree with me. There’s a tomato for everyone. (Photo to the right is of tomatoes grown by me courtesy of Hilde Reineck.)
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PPChocChampChocolate Champion tomChCh
This is a creation from the Dwarf Tomato project that I am honored to be offering for sale. It is a midseason regular leaf dwarf producing medium to medium large oblate chocolate brown fruit and lots of them. The flavor is nicely balanced and very tasty, and both appearance and flavor resemble Cherokee Chocolate. A member of the Cheeky Dwarf family (Golden Dwarf Champion X Cherokee Chocolate), Big Green Dwarf is the collaborative work of Patrina Nuske Small, Ray South (who named it), David Lockwood, Denise Bath, Bill Yoder, Mark Gladney, Ruth TenBrink, Craig LeHoullier and Bill Minkey.
This is an OSSI variety, “Pledge: You have the freedom to use these OSSI seeds in any way you choose. In return, you pledge not to restrict others’ use of these seeds or their derivatives by patents, or other means, and to include this Pledge with any transfer of these seeds or their derivatives.”
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chocolatelightningchocolatelightning2Chocolate Lightning tomChL
This is a Dwarf Tomato Project release. “The vigorous dwarf regular leaf plants are among the taller growing of the new dwarf varieties. The plants produce excellent yields of medium sized (4-8 ounce) smooth, slightly oblate chocolate colored tomatoes with jagged green and gold stripes. The rich crimson flesh has the intense flavor of black tomatoes, with great balance. The Beauty line is very complex and a few surprises could result when growing this variety, with stripes of different colors. This variety originated with a cross between Dwarf Wild Fred and Beauty King made by Vince Lavallo and named by him.”
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Dr. Lyle tomDrL
This is a well known heirloom. It was one of the varieties listed in 100 Heirloom Tomatoes for the American Garden by my friend Carolyn Male. The flavor is complex as she says. The fruit are large deep pink beefsteaks with ribbing.
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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERADwarf Blazing Beauty tomDBB
This is a variety from the Dwarf Tomato Project. I used all the fruit if this variety for seed saving, and I know I must have tried the fruit while doing that, but I don’t remember! Craig Lehoullier of the project (and now an author of a tomato book, Epic Tomatoes!) wrote:
“mid to late midseason; our first orange dwarf project release, produced on a vigorous potato leaf Dwarf plant. The fruit are medium to medium large, smooth oblate and a deep orange in and out. The flavor sparkles with an ample tart bite and is quite intense, resembling very much one of its parents, Elbe.”
This is an OSSI variety, “Pledge: You have the freedom to use these OSSI seeds in any way you choose. In return, you pledge not to restrict others’ use of these seeds or their derivatives by patents, or other means, and to include this Pledge with any transfer of these seeds or their derivatives.”
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Dwarf Firebird Sweet tomDFS
This is a new DTP release. The description from the project- “It is a regular leaf dwarf producing lots of medium sized oblate smooth pink fruit with vertical gold striping – truly beautiful – and with a rich, balanced flavor.” Dwarf Firebird Sweet was selected and named in 2013 by Craig LeHoullier. It originated from a cross between Dwarf Wild Fred (an F4 selection) and Beauty King (from Wild Boar Farm) by Vince Lavallo in 2011, which he named Beauty. Also involved with its development are Lurley Hernandez, Lindsey Ratterree, Dan Follett, Carolyn Keiper, and Nancy Ruhl. This seed was grown by Bill Minkey. LIMIT ONE per customer.
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tomgoldenheartslicedtomgoldenheartDwarf Golden Heart tomDGH
This is Dwarf Tomato Project release. “The vigorous dwarf regular leaf plants produce a heavy yield of medium to medium large sized (4-10 ounces) blunt heart shaped medium yellow fruit with a more pale colored flesh, possessing a delightful, balanced, sweet flavor. This variety originated with a cross between Anna Banana Russian and Roza Vetrov made by Patrina Nuske Small. It was named by Linda Black.” Photos are from Dan Follett that he took while working on the grow out.
This is an OSSI variety, “Pledge: You have the freedom to use these OSSI seeds in any way you choose. In return, you pledge not to restrict others’ use of these seeds or their derivatives by patents, or other means, and to include this Pledge with any transfer of these seeds or their derivatives.”
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Dwarf Kelly Green tomDKG
I’m very honored to be chosen as a vendor to offer a tomato from the Dwarf Tomato Project. Vendors had the opportunity to pick which variety they might like to carry. I chose Dwarf Kelly Green because of my affinity for green tomatoes.
Dwarf Kelly Green originating in the Sneezy family of the Dwarf Tomato Project (Golden Dwarf Champion X Green Giant, a cross made by Patrina_Pepperina of Tomatoville in 2005). It is an indeterminate regular leaf dwarf that will reach from 4-5 feet tall by the end of the growing season, and produce nearly round green-fleshed, clear skinned fruit in the 3-6 ounce range. The fruit have a well balanced, full, delicious flavor. Dwarf Kelly Green seems to be quite disease tolerant and one of the more prolific of the new Dwarf varieties. This variety was named by Craig Lehoullier in 2007 after his wife Sue’s beloved uncle, Edward Kelly, who had recently passed away. Photo is from my friend, T. Maiden.
This is an OSSI variety, “Pledge: You have the freedom to use these OSSI seeds in any way you choose. In return, you pledge not to restrict others’ use of these seeds or their derivatives by patents, or other means, and to include this Pledge with any transfer of these seeds or their derivatives.”
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Dwarf Golden Gypsy tomDGG
This Dwarf Tomato Project variety “originated with a cross made between Golden Dwarf Champion and Elbe made by Patrina Nuske Small in 2006 and named Tipsy. Dwarf Golden Gypsy was selected and named by Wendy Montanez. The vigorous potato leaf dwarf plants produce heavy yields of smooth oblate medium yellow fruit with pale yellow flesh, ranging from 8-18 ounces. The flavor is among the very best among the new dwarfs – intense, sprightly (with a distinct refreshing tang), and simply delicious. Involved are Patrina Nuske Small, Carolyn Keiper, Craig LeHoullier, Wendy Montanez, Susan Dzejachok, Dee Sackett, and Susan Oliverson.” This seed was grown and provided by Bill Minkey.
This is an OSSI seed variety. The Pledge reads: “You have the freedom to use these OSSI-Pledged seeds in any way you choose. In return, you pledge not to restrict others’ use of these seeds or their derivatives by patents or other means, and to include this pledge with any transfer of these seeds or their derivatives.”
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tomorange creamDwarf Orange Cream tomDOC
This Dwarf Tomato Project cultivar “originated with a cross made between Golden Dwarf Champion and Elbe made by Patrina Nuske Small in 2006 and named Tipsy. Dwarf Orange Cream was selected and named by Craig LeHoullier. The vigorous potato leaf dwarf plants produce heavy yields of uniquely colored pale orange smooth oblate fruit that have a nearly matte, dull finish, ranging from 8-12 ounces. As with most of the Tipsy family, the flavor is superb – intense, rich, and with a lively tang – clearly one of the best of our dwarf releases to date.
Unfortunately for me, this was not a good producer here in 2016.
Involved are Patrina Nuske Small, Craig LeHoullier, Susan Oliverson, Lisa Moore, and Dee Sackett.” Photo courtesy of S. Oliverson. This seed was grown and provided by Bill Minkey. LIMIT ONE per customer.
This is an OSSI seed variety. The Pledge reads: “You have the freedom to use these OSSI-Pledged seeds in any way you choose. In return, you pledge not to restrict others’ use of these seeds or their derivatives by patents or other means, and to include this pledge with any transfer of these seeds or their derivatives.”
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tomDwarfRussianSwirlF2Dwarf Russian Swirl tomDRS
This Dwarf Tomato Project variety “originated from a cross between Golden Dwarf Champion and Orange Russian #117 made by Patrina Nuske Small in 2005 and named Dopey. Dwarf Russian Swirl was selected and named by Craig LeHoullier. The vigorous regular leaf dwarf plants produce excellent yields of smooth oblate yellow tomatoes with red swirls and streaks that range between 6-12 ounces. The flavor is well balanced and tasty, reminiscent of the best indeterminate bicolor types. Involved were Patrina Nuske Small, Ray South, Craig LeHoullier, Jay Scott, Amanda Fischer, Antoniette Koshykar, Mike Mauer, Doug Frank, and Nancy Ruhl.” Photo is by Craig LeHoullier. This seed was grown and provided by Bill Minkey. LIMIT ONE per customer.
This is an OSSI seed variety. The Pledge reads: “You have the freedom to use these OSSI-Pledged seeds in any way you choose. In return, you pledge not to restrict others’ use of these seeds or their derivatives by patents or other means, and to include this pledge with any transfer of these seeds or their derivatives.”
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Earlibell POT tomEarlib
This historic variety was first available in 1905 from the Isbell’s Seed Company. Click Here to see a scan from their 1906 catalog that is part of Craig Lehoullier’s collection. I’m glad he has a copy because I can comment on what I thought compared to the ad. I’ve not grown Earliana so I can’t say whether I think it is an improvement. I did find it to be a very pretty red globe tomato that didn’t crack of a nice size(many were a bit larger than the one I photographed) so I would say they are spot on on that point. It wasn’t really super early for me though. I think there was a bit of fudging going on there. I found the flavor reminded me of round hybrids that I’ve tried, a bit acidic flavored. Determinate.
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Early Glee POT tomEG
I can see why someone named this variety Early Glee. It is early, the tomatoes are good sized for an early, and being smooth red fruit they look pretty. Some early fruit had green shoulders. It is a good producer of fruit too. It more acidic tasting than sweet. These were grown only in pots by me and seemed to have a determinate habit, but I’ve seen them listed as semi-determinate so in the ground maybe they would grown more.
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Ernesto tomErn
This Italian tomato can grow quite large and it looks like an Oxheart or Giant Pear depending on the individual fruit. What doesn’t vary is the great tasty meaty quality. It is a good paste or canner too. This tomato along with Rinaldo came from an old Italian Immigrant couple in the Detroit area. They brought this seed with them when they came to America. (Right photo courtesy of Hilde Reineck.)
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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAFred’s Tie Dye large POT tomFTD
This is a Dwarf Tomato Project release. Their description is:
“The vigorous dwarf regular leaf plants are among the taller growing of the dwarfs. Producing a good yield of medium to medium sized (5-6 ounce average) round purple tomatoes with jagged gold and green stripes and the deep crimson flesh of black tomatoes, Fred’s Tie Dye has a rich, intense, balanced flavor. This variety originated with a cross between Dwarf Wild Fred and Pink Berkeley Tie Dye made by Vince Lavallo and also named by him.” They are beefsteak looking though. If you go to Tatiana’s, you’ll see they look like mine.
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Emerald Evergreen aka Evergreen tomEver
This is another green when ripe variety. It a beefsteak that develops an amber cast to it when ready to pick and has a sweet taste. Photos courtesy of customer N. North.
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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAGolden Cherokee tomGoC
This is a terrific tasting tomato. Though called golden, the fruit are actually bi-color. It is said to be a sport of Cherokee Green which also tastes great, but the shape makes me think it was cross and not a sport. It does have that thin skin like others in the Cherokee family so these need to be eaten quick, but with their flavor that is not a problem.
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Green Doctor Frosted tomGDF
This green cherry has clear skin giving it a really cool looking appearance. This tomato developed as a skin mutation of Green Doctor which has a yellow epidermis. Green Doctor was a mutation from the cultivar Dr. Carolyn(named for my friend Carolyn Male) which is a white cherry. There is also a Dr. Carolyn Pink! Anyway, this variety causes arguments over whether or not it tastes good to growers. I like it. It is not a productive as some other cherry cultivars which are know for their ample harvest.
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Green Giant tom GrG
This is a popular beefsteak variety that was first distributed by Craig LeHoullier writer of Epic Tomatoes. He describes the flavor as approaching perfection. The flavor is great. Unfortunately for me this year, the plants did not perform well. I got early and late tomatoes. The unusual sustained high heat of this summer was not to their liking. I will try again another year as they are more than worth a second chance. The tomatoes stay very green upon ripening. Potato leaf. I forgot to take a pic.
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Grungy in the Sky Bicolor tomGrun
This variety won Best Overall at the 2014 Buffalo~Niagara Tomato TasteFest. It was named after Val “Grungy” McMurray who was a well known generous gardener. She was the source for some of my seeds including the popular ‘Top Sirloin’ (out of stock this year.) It is great that there is a tomato with such a cool name named after her. She sent some seed to Tom Wagner (breeder of ‘Green Zebra’ and others) and he bred the seed with another variety that is Late Blight resistant. Tom named he cross and then Good Mind Seeds got some of those seeds and stabilized them.
It is a small globe that does taste excellent. The skin is mostly red and the flesh mostly yellow. I can not comment on Late Blight resistance bred into it since I have not experienced that here yet (knock on wood it stays that way,) but it is suppose to have it. It is not Early Blight resistant. I got confused about that, and put the plants in a corner as I thought they would be resistant. I should have paid better attention to the description.
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Guernsey Island tomGuIsl
This is a really neat looking tomato. The small globes are a dark bronzy green with red stripes. The plants start producing fairly early and in large quantities. The fruits are juicy and the flavor is on the acidic side. It is a New Zealand heirloom.
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Hellfrucht aka Hell Fruit tomHel
The first time I saw this tomato plant growing in my tomato buddy Norm’s garden, I wanted to grow it. The name does not come from the fact that the fruit are red thought that helps; it is the leaf growth. The branches and leaves have a decidedly upward fire flames look to them. Unfortunately my pic is not the best, but you get the idea. In the garden, you really can pick out the plants of Hellfrucht by foliage alone. Norm originally got the seed on as trip to Germany. I believe it is a fairly popular variety there. The fruit are small red globes and produced in good quantity. A customer has informed me that Hellfrucht in German means bright fruit. Though it seems every listing I see says Hell Fruit. Bright still makes sense though since the fruit is like it is coming out of flames.
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Indian Stripe tomIndStr
This tomato is very similar to Cherokee Purple. Most people think it is a variant of Cherokee Purple and having grown them both at the same time, I would have to concur. This variety won best tasting at the 2009 Buffalo~Niagara Tomato TasteFest.
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Joe’s Plum tomJoP
I decided to switch it up and try different pastes this year in stead of Romeo. (Also see Santa Maria on the Buy Tomato Seeds L-Z page.) This is a large paste averaging over 1/2 lb, but I’ve seen much bigger. It is also very tasty for a paste.
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tomKangarooPawbrownKangaroo Paw Brown tomKPB
This Dwarf Tomato Project cultivar “originated with a cross between Budai Torpe and Cherokee Green made by Patrina Nuske Small in 2005 and named Witty. Kangaroo Paw Brown was selected and named collaboratively by Patrina, Tim Warren and Craig LeHoullier (Patrina with the Kangaroo Paw, and Tim and Craig as different colors arose). The vigorous regular leaf dwarf plants produce loads of smooth round brown (yellow skinned black) fruit that are in the 4 ounce range. The flavor is delightful – well balanced, and very tasty. Involved – Patrina Nuske Small, Tim Warren, Craig LeHoullier, Jay Scott, Kevin Taylor, Bob Fromm, Dee Sackett, Howard Kushner, Carol Knapp, and Doug Frank.” Noted at early. Photo by Patrina Nuske Small. This seed was grown and provided by Bill Minkey. LIMIT ONE per customer.
This is an OSSI seed variety. The Pledge reads: “You have the freedom to use these OSSI-Pledged seeds in any way you choose. In return, you pledge not to restrict others’ use of these seeds or their derivatives by patents or other means, and to include this pledge with any transfer of these seeds or their derivatives.”
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Kentucky Pink Stamper tomKPinkS
This variety makes big beautiful tasty tomatoes. Unfortunately for me, it didn’t make many tomatoes. This variety probably would be much more productive south of here. Potato Leaf.
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tomKookaburraCackleKookaburra Cackle tomKoC
This Dwarf Tomato Project variety “originated with a cross between an early generation Sleepy selection called Wilpena and Cherokee Purple made by Patrina Nuske Small in 2008 and named Plentiful. Kookaburra Cackle was selected and named by Patrina. The vigorous regular leaf dwarf plants produce lots of smooth oblate brown (yellow skinned black) fruit with a pleasant flavor that is on the tart side. Involved are Patrina Nuske Small, Rich Hawksworth, and Craig LeHoullier.”
This is an OSSI seed variety. The Pledge reads: “You have the freedom to use these OSSI-Pledged seeds in any way you choose. In return, you pledge not to restrict others’ use of these seeds or their derivatives by patents or other means, and to include this pledge with any transfer of these seeds or their derivatives.”
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Large Red tomLR
As you can see by the photo, this tomato is red, but not so large. I found the size very variable. It is an old variety. The earliest known listing of it is from 1843 in a Shaker seed catalog. So back then it probably was considered quite large. It is very pretty with the deeply ribbed shoulders and bright red color. Reading my copy of The Vegetable Garden from 1885, and it is mentioned in there with the synonym of ‘Large Red Italian’ which makes sense to me with its similarity in looks to the Costoluto varieties from Italy.
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tomLoxtonLadLoxton Lad tomLLad
This Dwarf Tomato Project variety “originated with a cross between Rosella Purple and Orange Heirloom made by Patrina Nuske Small in 2009 and named Rosy. Loxton Lad was selected and named by Patrina. The vigorous, productive regular leaf dwarf plant produces delicious orange smooth oblate fruit that range between 6-16 ounces, with a well balanced, delicious flavor; fruit size runs generally larger than it’s cousin, Loxton Lass. Involved are Patrina Nuske Small, Doug Frank, Shawn Conant, Patrick Sullivan, and Craig LeHoullier.” This seed was grown and provided by Bill Minkey. LIMIT ONE per customer.
This is an OSSI seed variety. The Pledge reads: “You have the freedom to use these OSSI-Pledged seeds in any way you choose. In return, you pledge not to restrict others’ use of these seeds or their derivatives by patents or other means, and to include this pledge with any transfer of these seeds or their derivatives.”
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tomLoxton LassTomLoxton Lass plantLoxton Lass tomLLas
This Dwarf Tomato Project cultivar “originated with a cross between Rosella Purple and Orange Heirloom made by Patrina Nuske Small in 2009 and named Rosy. Loxton Lass was selected and named by Patrina. The vigorous, productive regular leaf dwarf plant produces delicious orange smooth oblate fruit that range between 6-12 ounces, with a well balanced, delicious flavor. Involved are Patrina Nuske Small, Willa Osis, Doug Frank, Sue Bailey, Nancy Ruhl, Shawn Conant, and Craig LeHoullier.” Photos courtesy of S. Bailey. This seed was grown and provided by Bill Minkey.
This is an OSSI seed variety. The Pledge reads: “You have the freedom to use these OSSI-Pledged seeds in any way you choose. In return, you pledge not to restrict others’ use of these seeds or their derivatives by patents or other means, and to include this pledge with any transfer of these seeds or their derivatives.”
Sorry, now out of stock.
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Lucky Cross tomLuck
This is the big sister to Little Lucky. It is another tomato with exceptional flavor. The large bicolor beefsteaks are yellow with a pink blush. The pink blush spreads as the tomato ripens. Unfortunately for northern growers, it is late to mature. I have a love hate relationship with this tomato because of this. The phenomenal flavor keeps it on my grow list. Potato leaf.
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tomLuckySwirlLucky Swirl tomLSw
This Dwarf Tomato Project variety “originated with a cross between Dwarf Russian Swirl and Lucky Cross made by Ray South and called Jaunty. Lucky Swirl was selected and named by Marjorie Holloway. The vigorous, high yielding regular leaf dwarf plants yield smooth oblate yellow fruit with red swirls, running between 6-14 ounces. The flavor is very reminiscent of many of the well known indeterminate bicolored varieties such as Pineapple and Old German; sweet, mild and very tasty. The release is regular leaf. Involved are Ray South, Marjorie Holloway, Dee Sackett, Robbins Hail, Shawn Conant, Lisa Moore, Willa Osis, Justin Sieglaff, Marsha Eisenberg, Susan Oliverson, and Craig LeHoullier.” Photo is from the DTP and is by Marjorie Holloway. This seed was grown and provided by Bill Minkey.
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Malinowy Warszawski tomMaW
I grew this tomato because a customer requested it. The light to medium pink fruits varied from small globes to mini beefsteaks like the one in the photo. It seems to be relatively unknown here though fairly popular over in Poland. If you like beefsteak flavor but want a smaller tomato than this would be a good one for you. I believe the name translates to Pink/Raspberry from Warsaw. They ripened early, and I had a decent amount of fruit. Potato leaf. (The foliage in the photo does not belong to this tomato.)
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tomMaralingaMaralinga tomMara
This Dwarf Tomato Project cultivar “originated with a cross between an early generation Sleepy selection called Wilpena and Cherokee Purple made by Patrina Nuske Small in 2008 and named Plentiful. Maralinga was selected and named by Patrina. The vigorous regular leaf dwarf plants produce heavy yields of rich brown (yellow skinned black) tomatoes with deep crimson flesh that range between 6-12 ounces. The flavor shares the typical intensity of the best black tomatoes – rich, intense and memorable. Involved – Patrina Nuske Small, Craig LeHoullier, Patrick Sullivan, Lisa Moore, Rich Hawksworth, Shawn Conant, Scott Jacobs, Bill Yoder, and Doug Frank.” This seed was grown and provided by Bill Minkey.
This is an OSSI seed variety. The Pledge reads: “You have the freedom to use these OSSI-Pledged seeds in any way you choose. In return, you pledge not to restrict others’ use of these seeds or their derivatives by patents or other means, and to include this pledge with any transfer of these seeds or their derivatives.”
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Marcia’s Mystery Black
tomMMB
This tomato is a mistake from another seed company. My friend Marcia who attends the Buffalo~Niagara Tomato Tastefest brought it as Black Sea Man. It is not that. This is the second time I’ve grown this tomato. It is a regular leaf and seems to be a semi-determinate type. So why am I selling a no name? Well, it is very early for a beefsteak, and it tastes really good. It is not any other black tomato I’ve grown so far, and who knows, I or someone else may at some point ID it. Customers have asked about my carrying it as the characteristics of the tomato are more important than the pedigree. The photo is from mid-August in a not so good season as this one was, but it was already producing lots of tomatoes. The cracks on top were because of the torrential rains that happened while the tomatoes were growing.
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Moldovan Green aka Green Moldovan tomMoGr
From the assortment of green tomatoes at this year’s (2011) Tomato TasteFest, this one was a favorite of many attendees. It is very good tasting. It is a small green beefsteak that develops an amber blush, but still have a nice green to it when ripe. It was not overly productive for me, but being only a couple seedlings survived this spring’s horrible cold and wet, I can not say it would not perform better in another year. I will definitely grow this one again. You’ll often see this variety listed as Green Moldovan, but it was originally listed in the SSE catalog as Moldovan Green.
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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERANeves Azorean Red tomNAR
I sold this tomato seed way back when I first started the company and thought it was about time I regrew it! It is one of the best big red beefsteaks out there. The late Anthony Neves of MA brought a tomato from the Azores with him when he emigrated to the USA. It is a tad late for those of you with super short seasons.
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Olive Hill tomOH.
Reports from everyone who has grown this variety are the same; it is exceptionally productive. It is a deep pink tomato averaging about 3/4lb. They have a mild sweet flavor. Originally from Kentucky. Potato leaf. (Photo courtesy of Hilde Reineck.)
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Orange Fleshed Purple Smudge tomOFPS
This variety was one of the oddest things I’ve ever grown. The fruits were small and orange with purple shoulders. The orange color is a bit brighter than the photograph shows. The Purple coloration comes from Lycopersicon peruvianum which is in the gene pool mix of this variety. The color is more pronounced with exposure to light and low temps. I had both this season so the purple color came out quite nicely. The foliage though looked as if it had phosphorous deficiency for most of the growing season, and it was a bit wispy like many heart shaped tomatoes have. Every time I looked at the plants I had to remember that the foliage should look that way. I was expecting acidic flavor, not sure why, maybe because of the purple, but the meaty fruit were very mild in taste.
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P&J Ellis tomatoP and J Ellis tomPJE
This pink tomato was the taste winner of the year (2016) for me. I originally received seed of this one from my friend James who runs the Kansas City tomato tasting at the Local Pig there so I figured it must be good, and it is! I unfortunately planted them in a crummy spot so they did not fair well. They are a definite regrow in better conditions. (I know I seem to do this often to new tomatoes, but I don’t want to give up good real estate to a clunker so new tomatoes often get the crummy spots.) The tomato is not related to the Polish Ellis tomato.
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Pink Ping Pong tomPPP
This name never appealed to me because it makes me think that they will be hard balls that taste like a bad paste tomato. What an intro I’ve written! The name of course is referring to the size only, looking about the same as ping pong balls, and they are sweet and juicy. They do get a good write up in 100 Heirloom Tomatoes for the American Garden by Carolyn Male. (Got to love my tomato stained hands from seed saving in the photo.)
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Polish (Ellis) tomPolEl
There are a lot of tomatoes named with Polish in their name, and good general rule is if Polish is in the name, it probably is tasty. Since there are a lot of them, there is some sort of identifier as with Ellis in this case. The Ellis comes from the person, Bill Ellis, who originally sent the seeds to SSE(Seed Savers Exchange) not the family that brought them to the US. This is a deep pink beefsteak, the kind of pink that often gets called red by mistake. Potato Leaf.
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Pork Chop aka Porkchop tomPork
This beauty from Brad Gates was my surprise taste winner of the 2010 growing season. It is a very pretty beefsteak with its stripes. As it grows it develops light and dark green stripes then it becomes yellow and green striped and finally yellow and yellow/orange striped(click on the left photo to see the striping better.) I thought the flavor was fantastic, and I really wasn’t expecting it.Both times I’ve grown this it has been on the late side. I’ve seen a few sites selling this as ‘Big Yellow Zebra’, and I don’t know how that happened. It is not the name given by Brad.
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Purple Calabash tomPurC
Now this tomato is as purple as a tomato is going to get. Heavy on the ruffles, and unusual tasting, it is a conversation piece. People often disagree on this tomato with its looks and taste. It has been awhile since I grew this one, but I don’t remember disliking it(not like when I grew Early Girl, yuck!)
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Red Pear (Giant) Gransasso Strain tomRPGG
I bought this tomato seed some time ago now (pkt. show to the right,) and it is no longer commercially available in the US until now. I’ve been very please with this tomato both times I’ve grown it. It is productive even in in heat and will keep on producing late when much of the foliage has died off as in the middle photo. It tastes really good for a meaty cooking type tomato so it can be used fresh.
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Red Penna tomRPen.
This is a unique tasting variety. It is tomatoey and not sweet. It reminds me of some the tomatoes from my youth that the old gardeners used to grow. The tomatoes are large and attractive.
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Romeo tomRomeo
I had to grow this variety to make it more accessible to the general public. My internet friend Chemocurl spent a long time hunting down seeds, and she was kind enough to send some to me. This variety makes dependably huge red paste tomatoes. The ones in the pic are actually small compared to some of the fruit! The one I weighed at the Buffalo~Niagara TasteFest was just shy of a pound. They are very dry and meaty, definitely a paste tomato and not for fresh eating. They do not produce many seeds.
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Rosella_crimson_f7_patrina_htsRosella_crimson_sliced_patrina_htsRosella Crimson tomRoC
This is a new release from the Dwarf Tomato Project that I have been honored with sell to the public. “It is an early to midseason regular leaf dwarf, producing medium to medium large oblate fruit that have clear skin and red flesh, hence are a pink variety. Vigorous and productive, the flavor is excellent to outstanding, in some seasons approaching Brandywine in quality. A member of the Sleep family (Budai X Stump of the World), Rosella Crimson is the collaborative work of primarily Patrina Nuske Small (who named it), Craig LeHoullier, Linda Black, Denise Sackett, Justin Morse, Bill Minkey, with input from many others.” The name comes from the bird Crimson Rosella.
This is an OSSI variety, “Pledge: You have the freedom to use these OSSI seeds in any way you choose. In return, you pledge not to restrict others’ use of these seeds or their derivatives by patents, or other means, and to include this Pledge with any transfer of these seeds or their derivatives.”
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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERARosella Purple tomRoP
This was one of the first releases of the Dwarf Tomato Project. It was a very good grower for me this year (2014.) So it is understandable that this has been a big hit with many people. It is an intensely flavored tomato. I don’t recommend it though if you are a mild sweet fruit tomato lover. My tomato friend, Craig Lehoullier, loves this variety. Craig is one of the heads of the Dwarf Tomato Project, and he now also an author! He wrote Epic Tomatoes an excellent book for tomato lovers. This cultivar is the result of a cross between Budai Torpe (a small red fruited dwarf) and Stump of the World. It can be grown in a big (5 gall.) pot successfully.
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Sabre tomSab
I grew this variety for my Buffalo Sabres Hockey loving husband. There seems unfortunately to be a few varieties of tomatoes floating around with the name Sabre. This variety is the same pink one as offered by Sand Hill Preservation. It averages about 6-10 ounces. I found a lot of variability in size, and though mostly globe shaped, some were like a beefsteak as shown in the first pic. The flavor was very good. It also produced fruit well. A customer had told me that Sabre means a person from Israel, but I was informed by another customer that that is incorrect. Sabra is a person from Israel. Sabre is a female name which is derived from Sabra. I worked with a Sabre at one time. She was from out west and in coming to WNY everyone thought she was named for the Buffalo Sabres. Anyway, perhaps this variety is named after a woman named Sabre.
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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAShchelkovskiy Ranniy aka Shchelkovsky Early POT tomShR
This early Russian determinate variety is a compact grower, great for pots, with small/med. round to oblate red fruit. It is a favorite among northern short season growers. As with many of the early Russian varieties it has a stronger flavor.
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sweetadelaideSweet Adelaide tomSwA
This is another tomato from the Dwarf Tomato Project that I am honored to be selling. It is a midseason regular leaf Dwarf, producing medium to medium large oblate pink fruit with a balanced, delicious flavor. It is a vigorous and productive variety that makes a wonderful slicing tomato. A member of the Happy family (New Big Dwarf X Paul Robeson), Sweet Adelaide is the collaborative work of Patrina Nuske Small (who named it), Jeff Casey, Craig LeHoullier, David Lockwood, Lurley Hernandez, Ted Maiden, Doug Frank, Damon Huck, Tanya Kucak, and Bill Minkey, with input from many others.
This is an OSSI variety, “Pledge: You have the freedom to use these OSSI seeds in any way you choose. In return, you pledge not to restrict others’ use of these seeds or their derivatives by patents, or other means, and to include this Pledge with any transfer of these seeds or their derivatives.”
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tomTanundaRedTanunda Red tomTanR
This Dwarf Tomato Project variety “originated with a cross between an early generation Sleepy selection called Wilpena and Cherokee Purple made by Patrina Nuske Small in 2008 and named Plentiful. Tanunda Red was selected and named by Patrina. The vigorous regular leaf dwarf plants produce excellent yields of smooth oblate red fruit that range from 4-10 ounces. The flavor is rich, well balanced and delicious. Involved – Patrina Nuske Small, Craig LeHoullier, Carol Knapp, Sandra Tipton, and Marsha Eisenberg.” This seed was grown and provided by Bill Minkey.
This is an OSSI seed variety. The Pledge reads: “You have the freedom to use these OSSI-Pledged seeds in any way you choose. In return, you pledge not to restrict others’ use of these seeds or their derivatives by patents or other means, and to include this pledge with any transfer of these seeds or their derivatives.”
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Tigrovy (sometimes known as Tiger-Like) tomTig
The Russian name Tigrovy translates to Tiger-like and is so named because of the stripes on the fruit. I prefer to keep the names of tomatoes in their native tongue if they came to me that way. I believe it helps to avoid confusion later on. If you look at other country’s catalogs, they do not rename our tomatoes. Anyway, all that aside. This is a nice little tomato! The flavor is balanced between sweet and tangy. They started producing fairly early, and in good quantities. A customer down in TX this past year sent me updates and pics. It performed amazingly well down there, so it does do well in heat.
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Uluru OchreUluru Ochre1OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAUluru Ochre tomUOc
This a Dwarf Tomato Project release. I grew it this year, and think it is one of the ugliest things I’ve ever grown (though others disagree,) BUT the flavor was fantastic. This is the description from the DTP, “The vigorous dwarf regular leaf plants are relatively compact, quite early to produce and prolific. Producing a good yield of medium to medium to large sized (6-12 ounces) oblate uniquely colored tomatoes that are essentially the first “black/orange” we’ve seen – orange flesh with green overtones, and somewhat amber/orange/green in appearance when whole. The flavor can be a bit variable season to season, but at it’s best, is absolutely delicious. This variety originated with a cross between Orange Heirloom and Rosella Purple.” The photos to the left are from Patrina Nuske who also named this variety. LIMIT ONE per customer.
Sorry, now out of stock.
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A request from the breeder of Uluru Ochre, Patrina Nuske Small:
This new dwarf variety you have purchased is very unique due to its unusual colouring, and I would like to make sure it can be openly shared and made available to anyone wanting to grow or use it for breeding in the future. I would hate to see it used in any patent applications which would prevent other people being able to save or share its seeds, and in today’s world this is increasingly a problem, in fact it’s a huge problem. I would therefore like Uluru Ochre to be associated with the Open Source Seed Initiative (OSSI) and for packets to include the following pledge whenever people sell or share its seeds, also asking the person receiving the seeds to do the same.
The OSSI Pledge – http://osseeds.org/
You have the freedom to use these OSSI seeds in any way you choose. In return, you pledge not to restrict others’ use of these seeds or their derivatives by patents, and to include this pledge with any transfer of these seeds or their derivatives.
Thanking you on behalf of seed and food security for the future! Patrina.

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Victorian Dwarf POT tomVD
This dwarf as with all the dwarfs I’ve tried are little work horses pumping out a lot of tomates. It is almost like they are trying to prove their worth as a plant. The red tomatoes are slightly flattened globes with a few ribs. As with all the dwarfs this season, I grow these in pots so I can’t comment on garden planted size. In the pots they are about 2 feet tall.
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tomWaratahSlicedWaratah tomWar
This Dwarf Tomato Projecy variety “originated with a cross between an early generation Sleepy selection called Wilpena and Cherokee Purple made by Patrina Nuske Small in 2008 and named Plentiful. Waratah was selected and named by Patrina. The vigorous, high yielding regular leaf dwarf plants produce smooth oblate red fruit that range between 6-12 ounces, and have a rich, well balanced, delicious flavor. Involved are Patrina Nuske Small, Craig LeHoullier, Paige Prince, Susan Dzejachok, and Joyce Beggs.” This seed was grown and provided by Bill Minkey. LIMIT ONE per customer.
This is an OSSI seed variety. The Pledge reads: “You have the freedom to use these OSSI-Pledged seeds in any way you choose. In return, you pledge not to restrict others’ use of these seeds or their derivatives by patents or other means, and to include this pledge with any transfer of these seeds or their derivatives.”
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Wherokowhai tomWher
This is another Dwarf Tomato Project variety. I have to admit it didn’t do that great for me. It was late to get going and I never got a photo. It came out of a cross between Dwarf Russian Swirl (Dopey family) and Lucky Cross. It obviously has that late gene from Lucky Cross and is said to be like a dwarf version of it. So I saved some seeds, but never tasted it. I’m sure if it is like Lucky Cross it tastes great. This would be a good one for more southerly locations or start early inside to get a head start o nthe seaso n. Also the name Wherokowhai is pronounced “fer-dow-co-fi”. It is a New Zealand Maori word that means ‘red/yellow’. The variety was named by New Zealand project member Richard Watson.
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Willamette POT tomWill
This is a good determinate tomato for those with wilt problems. It is a red globe with nice flavor. It was early for me and produced all season. It was bred at Oregon State University by the late Dr. Tex Frazier.
Resitant to Fusarium Wilt, Race 1 and Verticillium Wilt.
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Zogola tomZog
This tomato is know for being able to grow to very large proportions. I don’t grow for size but I could easily see that with proper care, pruning, etc they could get huge. The red tomatoes are plentiful on the large plants. They are deeply lobed and can get misshapen when the fruits grow together on the plants. Polish heirloom.
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