Dec
01
2016

Buy BEAN and PEAS Seeds

All beans are OP(Open Pollinated.) Many are also Heirloom.

When buying the rarer varieties of beans that I sometimes offer, please try to save some to regrow or pass on to others. If you have a rare bean that you don’t plan on growing for awhile, store it in a moisture proof container like a small canning jar in your freezer. (When removing from freezer let come to room temp before opening as to not kill the seed.) With what seems like a blink of an eye, bean varieties disappear. I’ve seen someone searching this year for what  was once a commonly grown Lima. It is nowhere to be found.
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Bean varieties grown here and at the farm are organic, grown only with organic fertilizer/compost and no spraying, but they are not certified.
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Another thing to note as I found out this year some people do not know this~
Most heirloom beans eaten for fresh string beans should be eaten when the pod is plump, but before the pod starts to age. This is called “full.” Meaning, grocery store green beans are modern varieties that are picked to eat before the bean seed really develops. The hull of modern varieties turns tough as the seed develops. This is not true of most old varieties. Old varieties are meant to be eaten with bean seeds starting to develop in them. They are so tasty that way! I’m betting they have a much better nutritional value too.

To not junk up the page with too many out of stocks, I have made a
Bean Variety Reference Page, Click Here, of previously offered varieties.

VIEW ITEMS IN YOUR SHOPPING CART:

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POLE Varieties (Phaseolus vulgaris):

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Bean ‘Bosnian Pole’ bnBosP
This is a very rare bean. Some of you may have read about it in the SSE Members catalog or on GardenWeb. This bean came to me a few years ago as seed that was taken with a family who fled Bosnia during the war there. I knew the dry beans were special looking. They are shaped like a romano, but unusually colored. The dry seed when first harvest looks the beans to the upper left. They almost look bi-colored since the tan is so light, but if you look close, you can see the white. After a year or two, they look like the beans to the upper right and the tri-color is quite evident. . As they age, they get even darker.
OK besides being cool looking, the green beans are incredibly tasty. They are a flat podded romano type. The beans can get quite plump and there are no strings. The only downfall to this bean is it seems to not like high temps so during the high heat of summer, you won’t see beans. My plants though made up quick once the temps dropped back down into the 80 degree range. 25 seeds for $3.00.
Limit ONE per customer.




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caseknife beanCaseknife beanCaseknife aka ‘White Dutch’ bnCase
This is the very old documented bean whit white seeds. It is better known today as Caseknife (or Case Knife) but back in the 1800’s it was more often known as ‘White Dutch’ as it is listed in Vilmorin’s book The Vegetable Garden. There it gets a glowing review. To eat as a green bean, the pods must be small. Once to their full 8-10″ size, they become fibrous. The plants are vigorous and produce lots of pods. The white beans are fairly large and great for using as a dry cooking bean. It is easy to see why this one still exists today. 30 beans for $3.00.




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Bean ‘Cherokee Trail of Tears pole bnCTOT
I grew this one back a few years ago, and was quite happy with it. The vines were good producers of purple podded beans. When young, if I remember correctly, they were stringless, but strings developed pretty quick once the seeds started to grow. Though I only ate them as green beans, they are supposed to be a good dry bean too. I had no problem collecting lots of dry seed from the vines for seed saving.
The name of this bean come from the a very sad time in American history when the Cherokee were moved by the US government from their Eastern homeland to a territory west of the Mississippi. To read a bit more, Click Here. As with many people in olden days when they moved by choice or force, one thing they brought with them was seed, and this variety came from a family who had survived the relocation. 50 seeds for $2.00.




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beanetowahEtowah bnEto
Information from my friend Tony West who owns the Appalachian Heirloom Plant Farm~ “Overhill Cherokee bean, still somewhat common in eastern Tennessee today. Once was sold commercially by the Hastings Seed Company. This was sold by itself and also sold in a bean and corn seed blend, the corn being white Hickory King.” The purple stemmed plants got loaded with these fairly slender green beans with a purple overlay, and were quick to mature to a dried bean. Good for those in short season areas. A customer that lives in Etowah, TN told me that Etowah means Muddy Waters.
Limit TWO per customer. 30 seeds for $3.00.




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BEAN FLAMINGOBean ‘Flamingo pole bnFla
This bean is a result of a crossed Jeminez bean. Instead of the green pods that redden with age, Flamingo is covered in bright pink spots from the start. When cooked they turn to yellow.  So it is a wax bean not a green bean. A very interesting new bean. Once to the shelling stage, they become completely pink. Limit ONE per customer. 30 seeds for $3.00.




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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAGoose aka Ma Williams pole bnGoosFrom Darrel Jones of Selected Plants, “Goose is a consistent heavy producer in the heat and humidity here in North Alabama. It is best used as a huge shelly bean when the pods turn a pale yellowish pink color. I did not like them as snaps, especially by comparison with some really good snap beans.” My forum friend Zeedman also agrees, “the strength of this bean is its use as a green shell, for which it is outstanding. It bears early for such a large-seeded pole shelly, at about 80 days. The ripe pods are not only beautiful, but shell easily. Provided that the vines are not too closely spaced, the yield will be heavy from top to bottom.
The seeds are grayish in shell stage, flattened, and about 7/8″ long X 1/2″ wide X 1/3” thick. Their skin is thin & tender, but does not crack easily when cooked. The flavor is rich, with a fine texture, unlike the “potatoey” taste & texture of most of the large shellies I have tried.” (quotes from an old GardenWeb forum post.) 50 seeds for $2.25.




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Bean ‘Jembo Polish’ bnJPol
This is my one of my favorite overall beans. It is pretty rare and should be more well known. It is very vigorous and makes lots of tasty beans that do not have strings until very late stage. They are a flat podded variety but do not have seeds like a romano. My photo of Earl’s Faux tomato has Jembo Polish pods to the right of the scale. To see the pic Click Here. The seeds are quite large for a string bean. I’ve had people look at them and think they were Lima seeds. They might be good as a dry bean for cooking, but I’ve not tried them that way. Limit TWO per customer. 25 seeds for $3.00.





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bean juanita smithbean juanita smithJuanita Smith bnJuSm
I’m glad I grew this one as it is so different. I though the little beans were neat looking, gray with the black speckling when I got them at the swap in Berea, KY.  I had no idea they would be so unusual when growing them. The pods as you can see in the pic  are a green that turn to a red, and as the seed mature they turn a very dark purple. Once the pods are dry, they are black. Limit TWO per customer. 30 seeds for $3.00.



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beankentuckywonderBean ‘Kentucky Wonder’ bnKW
This is a very popular old heirloom. The green beans are long and stringless, loved by many. In my copy of Vilmorin’s The Vegetable Garden from the late 1800’s I have found out that this bean used also be called ‘Old Homestead’ and ‘Seek-no-Further’. 75+ seeds for $1.50.
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beanlazywifegreasybean lazy wife greasyBean ‘Lazy Wife Greasy bnLWG
These are the fattest greasy pods I’ve ever seen! The bean seeds themselves are very large, white, and cut-short. Cut-short refers to when bean seeds look like the ends have been chopped off so they look like chiclets. Greasy refers to the pods being hairless so they have a shiny greasy look to them instead of the matte appearance of regular green beans. It is originally from Madison Co, NC.  LIMIT TWO per customer. 30 seeds for $3.00.



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beanlazywifeOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERABean ‘Lazy Wife’ pole bnLazW
This heirloom is know to be an old stringless variety. Many old varieties as you may know have to be de-stringed before cooking and of course this one was easier on the cook. *UPDATE!! The rest of the description has been changed because of new information~ I was made aware that the heirloom beans called Lazy HOUSEwife are in fact not the same as the old bean named Lazy Wife. Both bean seeds are white, but The Lazy Wife bean would be plumper and more rounded where as Lazy Housewife is more elongated. See the photo to the right for ID purposes. I do not know if they are related to each other or not at this time. The original seems to be much rarer, and when the newer one arose, I’m not sure, but in my Beans of NY book from 1931, the original Lazy Wife is photographed so it had to be sometime after then. Regardless, this Housewife bean has still be around for a long time and is a good one to grow. Please note, we now have ‘Lazy Wife’ in stock and not the other. 50 beans for $2.25.



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.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA‘Mayflower aka ‘Amish Knuttle’ bnMay
This is a bean that has been around for a long time probably from the 1700’s. It goes by many other names including Red Nightfall and Red Speckled Cutshort. Those two names are listed in Vimorin’s Vegetable Garden from the 1800’s, but it seems to be better known by Mayflower these days. I’ve seen it written that it came with the Mayflower, but I find that history suspect. It is known to have been grown by the Amish for a very long time. In any case, this is obviously a well loved bean having such a long history. (My camera is broke as soon as the new one comes and I figure out how to use it, lol, I will get a picture up.) 50 beans for $2.00.



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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERABean ‘Melungeon bnMelu
This is a fat green bean. Unfortunately, I didn’t take a pic of the pods. The seeds are light with dark purple speckled in the same manner as Turkey Craw or Mayflower beans. It seems to be a pretty rare one. I picked up seeds for these from my beany friend Frank Barnett when I was in KY at the heirloom seed swap last year. They grow great and are prolific for eating, but for seed savers in short season area, getting seed to save in large quantities may be an issue.
The Melungeon people’s history is fascinating. I first heard of them watching a show on PBS. I’m not sure if it was on a show or reading an article that historians weren’t sure when the name came from. Being of Italian decent, I remember the old derogatory term for black people that is rare to hear nowadays pronounced moo-lan-john which is a slang of melanzana meaning eggplant and that is so similar Melungeon that I can’t think they are not related. But I am not a historian, just a history lover.
From what I can gather, not much info out there, but this bean is from Scott Co., VA. according to this Site (page 98,) Click Here. Frank Barnett though says the bean came from Wise Co., VA which is close by. It is quite likely that it traveled from one county to the other.
Limit ONE per customer. 30 seeds for $2.00.



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bean minnie shatterleybeaN MINNIE SHATTERLYMinnie Shatterly bnMiSh
This is a very productive bean from the Smoky Mountains in TN. I can definitely see this becoming a favorite for many people. I also acquired the seed from Frank Barnett. He is very good at knowing a great bean when he sees one. 30 seeds for $3.00



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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA‘Ojo de Cabra’ (Tarahumara Ojo de Cabra aka Goat’s Eye aka Eye of the Goat)  bnODC
This bean originally comes from the Tarahumara Native Americans from the northwest region of Mexico. The beans can be used as a green bean or as a shelled cooking bean. It is quick to make beans and productive. 50 seeds for $2.25.



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Bean ‘Purple Podded Pole’ bnPPP
This pole bean is a favorite of many. It is productive and makes deep purple easy to find stringless bean pods. From what I’ve read, they were discovered in the 1930’s in an Ozark garden by the seedman Henry Field. As with all purple beans, the color disappears once cooked. Photo courtesy of Blane H. of MS.
50 seeds for $2.00.



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Bean ‘Rattlesnake’ bnRatt
This well known popular heirloom pole has long green pods streaked with purple which makes for easy picking. They are stringless while young before the seeds develop. A good one to grow if you’ve got kids. Photo courtesy of customer Iris P.H.
75+ seeds for $1.75.
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Bean ‘Red and White Fall bnRWF
This fairly unknown heirloom fall/October bean is productive and tasty. This variety can be a tad late for seed saving in the north. Fall beans are very popular in the Appalachian area of the US. They should be more well known. You can use them in all stages. They can be eaten as green beans with nice plump seeds in them, and they can be shelled fresh or dried for later use. The dry seeds are very pretty. 30 seed for $3.00. Limit ONE per customer.



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Red Eye Fall bnREG
This is a rare bean. I think after people try it, it will become quite popular. The beans are incredibly tasty. I don’t think I’ve had better. They have no strings when plump which the way I like to eat beans. So they are a snap to prepare. They also mature quickly which is great for everyone to the north.
Originally these were named ‘Red Eye Greasy’. After having gone to the Oct. seed swap at the Sustainable Mountain Agriculture Center Berea, KY a few yeas back, I found out that these are NOT greasy beans. They are Fall aka October beans. Bill Best and I discussed the beans and one that he has that is very similar. The red marking is not as strong on his. His came from Tennessee. This bean came to me via my forum friend Keith. He received them from a lady named Kathy who was in TN. Unfortunately, her old email does not work. (If you are out there Kathy, please contact us.) The pods are smoother and not tacky like some beans and we figure that is why greasy was attached to the name. Back in stock, a seedy friend sent me a supply. 30 beans for $3.00. 



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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERARed Striped Greasy bnRSG
As you can see this is plump looking greasy. The red striping is faint on the green bean, but as it ripens to shelling stage you can see the red on the yellow easier. This is a Kentucky heirloom. Limit ONE per customer.



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Bean Smith Osbornebean smith osborneSmith Osborne Fall bnSOF
Sorry for the poor green bean photo. These beans are much better looking than it. It is a productive green bean to be eaten at the full stage that becomes white with bright red stripes at the shelling stage. The pods are not too long and the seed is a tad smaller than other fall beans. It was quick to make dry seed. This bean was given to me by my friend Juanita H. down in KY as it is a favorite of hers.



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south carolina red stickSouth Carolina Red Stick aka ‘Red Stick’ bnCRS
I picked up there beans at the KY seed swap as I really like the red seed. This SC heirloom has been said to have been grown since the early 1800s, and that is plausible to me as the seeds look like thin kidney beans and red kidney bean have been around for ages. It was a good grower and quick to mature.
30 seed for $2.50.



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bean spanglerpoleSpangler Pole bnSpP
This variety has very fat green beans.They are still good for a green bean at stage pictured. It is a great bean, but not good for northern short season growers for seed saving. Limit ONE per customer. 30 seed for $3.00.



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Bean ‘Turkey Craw’ aka ‘Turkey Gizzard’ bnTurC
This is an old Kentucky bean. It supposedly was originally found in gizzard of a turkey. Whether the story is true or not, it is a well loved bean. Very productive. Good for canning. 75 beans for $2.25. 



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HALF RUNNER varieties (Phaseolus vulgaris):

‘Jim Tye bnJTye
This white seeded green bean came from John McNeil, a beany friend in KY. The name comes from his great-grandfather, James Madison Tye, who was born in 1894 in Knox Co., KY. Jim Tye went to his father-in-law’s farm in Windfield, IN around 1938 and brought back these bean seeds. So the origin before that point is lost, but it is a productive NT(non-tough) type bean, and that is why the family still grows it to this day. Limit TWO per customer. 30 seeds for $3.00.




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Bean ‘Pink Half Runner’ aka ‘Red Peanut’ aka ‘Old Joe Clark’ bnPinkHR
This bean has obviously been around for a long time with so many names, and it is liked by many people. It can be used as green bean or shelling bean. The pods turn red as they mature. Half-runners will not grow as large as poles, but still need some support. 75 beans for $2.00. 



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‘State Half Runner bnStHR
This heirloom has tasty green beans that are good for fresh eating or canning. 75 seeds for $1.25. 
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BUSH varieties (Phaseolus vulgaris):

Alice Sunshine bnAliS
This was very good growing bush bean this year (2016.) The nice sized pods develop fairly early and dry beans come fast too. The seed is pretty (photo coming soon,) and hence why I decided to give this one a try. It was developed by the late Robert Lobitz of Paynesville, Minnesota who was a member of Seed Savers Exchange. He also bred ‘Red Swan’ listed a few down here. Limit ONE per customer.




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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERABlack Turtle bnBTu
This is the very well known cooking bean of black bean soup, rice and beans, and other dishes from Latin America and the Caribbean. These seeds were grown by Arden Farm (Certified Organic) separate from my bean plants so I can’t comment directly on their growth, but they had a good harvest, so it seems they are easy to grow.  50 seeds for $2.00. 



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‘Cherokee Wax bnCWax
This is a popular yellow bean from the late 1940’s. The color is a nice strong gold. It is also early to produce and stringless. AAS winner in 1948. 75 seeds for $1.50. 



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dragontonguelindsey‘Dragon Tongue’ aka ‘Dragon Langerie’ and ‘Merveille de Piemonte’ bnDrT
This is a popular heirloom variety of Dutch origin. Many gardeners will tell you this is a favorite. It is a flat podded wax bean with purple streaking. It is stringless.  Bucket photo courtesy of a generous customer. 75+ seeds for $1.25. 



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Bean ‘Flageolet bnFlag
This is a French cooking bean. I first learned of this bean through a very knowledgeable bean grower who loves them. It is unusual in it coloration being light green. They can be fresh shelled for you favorite bean soup, casserole, etc. or dried. The flavor is excellent and they have a nice creamy texture. 50 seeds for $2.00. 



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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAHutterite Soup bnHuS
This old heirloom is loved for its creamy texture.  This is a vigorous bush and may act like a half-runner for some people. Being originally from northern Europe and then the upper parts of the US and Canada, this is a good one for short season growers.
50 for $2.00. 



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Bean ‘Petite FiletbnPeF
When you think of the small French green beans often called Haricot Vert, these are those type of beans. If you buy them at the grocery store, you know know they cost quite a bit more than the regular green beans. So if you love them, not only will you save money, but they will taste even better coming from your own garden. These are small bush beans so plant accordingly in the garden or plant in pots. 75 seeds for $1.50. 



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Bean ‘Purple Queen’ bnPQ
This bean makes beautiful dark purple pods that are easy to spot and make for an attractive plant. A zone 5 NYS gardener wrote, “I like Purple Queen best so far for a purple snap bush bean. I like them better than Royal Burgundy/Purple. They are more prolific and have good flavor.” As with all purple beans, the color disappears once cooked. 75 seed for $1.25. 
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Bean ‘Red Swan’ bnRSw
This is a new bean cultivar that is quite interesting. It is a cross between a pinto and a purple snap bean, and the result is a pretty red hued, flat bean. It is stringless. It was bred by the late Robert Lobitz, a long tine SSE member, from Minnesota. 50 seeds for $2.00. 



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.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERASanta Maria Pinquito bnSMP
These little pink beans are most often used in making bean side dishes with tri-tip like the recipe on this page, Click Here, but of course you can use them in any dish you like. I did not try the beans green to see if they were good that way. I grew them in pots  and did not see much vining, but I’ve read semi-bush so in the ground they may be more of a half-runner. 75 for $2.00. 



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Bean ‘Tendergreen’ bnTend
This is a popular stringless green bean. They can and freeze well from what I’ve read. AAS winner 1933. 75+ seeds for $1.25. 
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‘Tennessee Green PodbnTnGP
This green bean had been around since the 1800’s and was introduced commercially in the early 1900’s. The pods have a flattened Romano bean type look to them. Other names it is known by are ‘Brown Bunch’, ‘Case Knife’,’Fields First Early’, and ‘Knife Blade’. With that many aliases you know it is a good one. 75 beans for $2.25. 



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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA‘Tiger’s Eye‘ aka ‘Pepa de Zapallo’ bnTEy
This a unusual color bean seed being an earthy yellow shade with darker maroon stripes, and it will make occasional maroon with yellow spots seeds. It is know to be a good cooking/shelled bean with a great creamy texture. It can send up short runners so some small support or extra space should be given. Originally from South America. 50 seeds for $2.00. 



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FAVA varieties (Vicia faba):

Bean ‘Extra Precoce A Grano Violetto’ aka ‘Extra Precoce Violetto’ favViol
This variety’s name means extra early purple seed. There are also green seeded varieties of Favas, but I grew up eating the purple kind so I picked this to carry. We always ate them simply cooked in a bit of water with garlic, pepper, salt, olive oil, and a touch of butter. Accompanying them was always good hearty Italian bread. You used the bread to sop up the juice. (I’m getting hungry writing this.) Unlike regular beans Favas do well with cool weather. Having a short season variety is nice since so many areas like here go from cool to hotter than Hades right quick. They can also be planted in late summer for a fall crop in places south of here. In places like Florida, they can be planted as a winter crop. 25 seeds for $2.50.

 




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LIMA/BUTTER Varieties (Phaseolus lunatus):

‘Christmas‘, pole limaChr
By customer request~ This is a big old heirloom Lima. The beans are maroon and white. They are nutty in flavor and creamy in texture. This variety is know by many names including ‘Fagioli del Papa'(Pope’s beans,) ‘Large Speckled Calico’,’Giant Butter’, and ‘Giant Florida Pole’ 25 seeds for $1.75.




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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA‘Dixie Speckled Butterpea’, bush limaDSB
This is a small lima or as often called down south, butter pea. It is a favorite variety of many gardeners. The bushes are small and after the first harvest, they can re-bloom and set beans again. They do well here, and they do well in pots.
75 seeds for $1.50.
Sorry, now out of stock.
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‘Florida Speckled Butterbean’, pole limaFSB
This is a popular climbing variety of baby lima bean. They do well in hot southern weather. 75+ seeds for $1.50.
Sorry, now out of stock.
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‘Jackson Wonder Butterbean’, bush limaJWB
This variety originally from Georgia was first introduced 1888. The beans when shelled are tan with dark purple markings. They turn reddish brown when cooked. The will do well up north. 75 seeds for $1.50. 
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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERALoudermilk, bush limaLou 
I’ve seen this variety listed as pole, but what I have is definitely a bush. It is an easy to grow variety even up north, early to mature. The beans do look like they are suppose to so I have no idea about the pole vs. bush issue. It is fairly rare to begin with so pinning down the answer may be difficult. While doing a search on something else, I found a reference to a Lauderback pole butterbean (page 71.) Perhaps there was some name confusion at some point? Sorry, now out of stock.
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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAburpeesfarmannua1891watl_0033burpeeswillowleafbean1892‘Willow Leaf pole Lima bnWil
This heirloom from the 1800’s is an attractive growing plant. The leaves are more lance shaped than normally seen hence the willow name. The name originally included Burpee’s. As to why it was dropped, I’m not sure. Many other varieties of vegetables and flowers still carry names signifying they came from them. The white limas are on the smaller side what many would consider a butterbean. It grows well down south for sure. Up north, it may be a challenge though needing about 85 warm days to produce. On the south side of a building when it stay hotter may be the way to experiment with it. The name originally was Burpee’s Willow Leaf. The text pic (click to enlarge) is from 1891 when Burpee first introduced it. The color pic is from thew 1892 catalog. As to why Burpee’s was dropped from the name, I’m not sure. Many other varieties of vegetables and flowers still carry names signifying they came from them. 50 seeds for $2.00. 



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COWPEAS aka SOUTHERN PEAS (Vigna unguiculata):

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAPiggott Family Heirloom cwPFH
This is a very tasty Louisiana family heirloom. The family has grown them since the mid 1800’s. The plants are vining to about 8′. I ran into a customer in KY, and she could not say enough good things about this variety! Vigorous grower and producer. 75 seeds for $1.75.

 




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rice pea‘Rice Pea’ aka ‘Rice’ cwRice
The seeds of this variety are so cute, maybe that doesn’t sound right, lol. They are tiny and a pale ecru color (photo coming soon,) and when I saw them, I had to grow them. The small bushes are easy to grow even up north. They do well in pots/buckets. Limit ONE per customer. 30+ seed for $2.50.



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‘Top Pick Pinkeye Purple Hull cwTPPPH
I am by no means an expert on cowpeas so I picked this variety based on the video on YouTube called “How to Grow Purple Hull Peas” as it was the recommended variety.

The pods are set above the foliage which makes them easy to see and pick hence the addition of Top Pick to the name as there are other Pink Eye Purple Hulls out there. 75 seeds for $1.75.



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EDAMAME/SOY Varieties (Glycine max):

Bean Soybean/Edamame ‘Beer Friend’ bnSoyBF
By customer suggestion ~ This variety’s name come from the fact that in Japan, they are a bar snack as peanuts are here. We seem to use them more in recipes here, but I do like to cook soybeans in the pod, salt them, and then eat them out of the pods. No matter what you do with them, this seems to be a good variety to grow. 30 for $1.75.

 




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Bean, Soybean/Edamame ‘Korean Black’ bnSoyKB
The seed coats of this variety are very dark, quite unusual. The interior of the beans are still green. They are very flavorful. 30 seeds for $2.00.
Sorry, now out of stock.
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ASIAN varieties:

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Asparagus aka Yard Long, Red Seeded (Vigna unguiculata sesquipedalis) bnAsp
This popular variety also produces very long thin green pods without strings and looks like the photos shown for the black seeded cultivar above.. Some think it tastes like a bean asparagus cross hence the name, but I just taste bean. The Yard Long name is of course from the amazing length of the pods. Sometimes they get quite big as in the photo to the right. In general thought they average a bit over a foot long. Produces long vines like a pole bean. Great for areas with hot summers, but will still do well up north. Dry seeds are red. 50+ seed for $1.25.

 

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SCARLET RUNNER varieties (Phaseolus coccineus):

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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAyocote Morado (Purple Runner aka Oaxacan Purple) bnAyM
This is a Mexican heirloom runner bean. The bean seeds are lavender, very pretty. Please note that though the beans come from Mexico, they still do not form bean pods in really hot weather. So do not get discouraged if you don’t see beans during the high heat of summer, as soon as it gets to more reasonable temps, the beans will come. The beans though still large are smaller than other runner beans. 30 beans for $2.00.

 




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‘Insuk’s Wang Kong’ bnIWK
I received this bean from my GW forum friend Jim W. It is an excellent hot weather runner bean. It will not make beans when it is in the 90’s but it will look good and bloom as is shown in my Aug. 11 photo. It is also a hummingbird attractor! I did not know this until one day a hummer and and I scared each other. The origins of this bean are in Korea where Jim’s wife, Insuk, originally came from. Wang Kong means King Bean in Korean. The beautiful shelled beans vary from solid lavender to solid black and an occasional solid white. 25 seeds for $3.00.
So sorry, these have disappeared already! Out of stock until Fall 2017 harvest.
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‘Painted Lady’ bnPLad
This bi-color version of scarlet runner is very pretty and always sought after. The tops are an orange red and the bottoms are white. To see photos on Dave’s Garden, Click Here. 20 seeds for $2.75. 



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SCARLET RUNNER BEAN bnSRun
This traditional vine is as at home in the flower garden as it is in the veggie garden. The blooms are a bright hot red. It is a hummingbird attractor. So it is more often grown here in the US as an ornamental, but in other places like the UK, it is grown for the edible beans. I cooked the green beans this past year, and they taste like regular green beans. To me they were ok, but to a friend that grew them, she just loved the green beans. As I’ve said before everyone has their own tastes, and you have to try to know. The dried beans are quite large like big Limas. 25 seeds for $2.00. 



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OTHER Ornamental Beans:

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Canavalia gladiata (SWORD BEAN)

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERACanavalia gladiata (SWORD BEAN) bnSword
I became enamored with these Jack and the Bean Stalk type beans after seeing Allan Armitage talk about about them this winter at the Plant WNY winter conference. He gave out beans, and I got one, but I lost the darn thing, lol. So I actually bought some wholesale, and I’m offering the extras that I do not plant here. The plants are quick to grow (I started them in pots inside to get a head start) and get quite large probably over 10 feet easy so they need a large support. The flowers are white-pink and the pods are quite large as are beans in them. It is quite ornamental. There’s a lot of conflicting info about their edibility. When the pots are young, they seem to be edible after cooking. Beyond that point they need special preparation so do not consume unless you know what you are doing. 4 beans for $3.50.

 




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Dolichos lablab (HYACINTH BEAN VINE) HBVine
This purple stemmed twining vine has scented lavender flowers that look similar to sweet peas. Another plus to the is vine is the seed pods are a beautiful purple giving them ornamental interest. The bean pods are eaten in Asian countries. There seems to be conflicting report of toxicity. Cooked young fresh pods are fine. Dried seed is potentially hazardous having high levels of cyanogenic glucosides, and should not be eaten unless having been properly prepared. They need to be boiled with a couple changes of water, so unless you know what you are doing stick to eating cooked young fresh pods. 15 seeds for $1.75. 
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PEAS:

alaskapeaPea ‘Alaska’ aka ‘Earliest of All’ (Pisum sativum) peaAla
This heirloom is from the early 1880’s. From what I’ve read, the original English name was ‘Earliest of All’ which is a fine name, but it got marketed as ‘Alaska’ here in the States and ‘Alaska’ stuck. This variety grows to about 3′ tall and is a good canning and soup type. 75+ seeds for $1.25.

 




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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAPea ‘Blue Podded aka ‘Blauwschokkers‘ (Pisum sativum) peaBP
This is a really neat variety to grow. The pods are a dark dusky purple-blue instead of the normal green. I grew them a few years ago and they grew well here. The pic I took is obviously from before they filled out. They are a climbing variety, 4-6′ tall. This variety is not really meant for fresh eating, but I gave some to a local garden for children and they found the undeveloped flat pods were a good snow pea substitute and were used like a chip to dip in hummus. Full, the hulls are tough like other peas, and the peas themselves have a good creamy flavor, but not as sweet at regular. It is a soup pea so its suppose to be starchier instead of super sweet. 75 seeds for $2.00. 



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Pea ‘Green Arrow’ (Pisum sativum) peaGrA
This pea is the favorite of a legume expert friend of mine (Zeedman) who has grown many varieties. I’ve read lots of favorable reports from other too. Plants grow 2-2 1/2 feet tall. Originally from England. 75+ seeds for $1.25. 



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Pea ‘Tall Telephone’ aka ‘Alderman’ (Pisum sativum) peaTT
I’m partial to this variety since I’ve been growing it a long time. It get taller than many other varieties so I grow it along my fences in the flower borders. Once they are done, other vines like morning glories have worked their way up the fence to replace them. Of course they are equally fine growing in the vegetable garden. If you’ve never grown peas, you really should. They are so good. I end up not having many make it into the house because I love eating them out in the garden. 75+ for $1.25. 



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Pea, Snow ‘Dwarf Grey Sugar’ ( Pisum sativum var. saccharatum) peaDGS
I choose this variety since it seems to be a garden favorite of many. I’m not sure why this it is called dwarf though when it grows 2 -2 1/2′ tall, and there are shorter varieties out there. There must of been a taller Gray Sugar at one time. Anyway, I love snow peas in stir fry. You don’t really need to even cook them, just toss them in at the end to warm them up. Like regular peas, these grow well in cooler weather.
75+ seeds for $1.25. 



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Pea, Sugar Snap ‘Super Sugar Snap’ peaSSS
This variety is a newer version of ‘Sugar Snap’ and by all accounts is a better version with more disease resistance. I have received many favorable review from customers for this variety and will stick with it. Sugar snap type peas are really sweet. They are easy to deal with since the whole pod is edible. The vines grow to about 5′ so they need support. As with regular peas, these are a cool season crop.
75+ seeds for $1.50. 



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Written by remy in: |

4 Comments

  • remy says:

    Hi Linda,
    I received a note from Jim W., the gentleman who I originally received the seeds from. He said for southern FL, it may be best to plant late summer/earlyfall for blooms into winter.
    Remy

  • remy says:

    Hi Linda,
    Sorry I do not know where else to get them. Sand Hill does not have them this year. Mine sold out fast. I hope I will have more in the fall.
    You could try asking on garden forums for a trade.
    Remy

  • LINDA says:

    Hi, I am trying to find Insuk’s Wang Kong’seeds. Have just started growing Scarlet Runner bean – it is beautiful now , but understand it will not bear in hot weather. It gets REALLY HOT in S. FL so I thought I would try Insuk’s Wang Kong’. Do you know when you will have them available? or where I could find some for sale?
    I am trying to find vegetables that can tolerate the extreem heat FL summers bring.
    Thank you,
    Linda

  • Heather-Lin Brannon says:

    The hyacinth bean vine is a favorite in my garden. After reading all the conflicting information on the web about it’s supposed edibility or toxicity, I set about cautiously experimenting for myself.

    I have found that the tender leaves steam up well, bright new flowers are wonderful raw, as are the immature beans. Pick a bright purple pod with obvious signs of swelled beans, and you will find green seeds inside, There is a bit of a skin on the seed, but if you nip off the end and squeeze out the inside part of the bean, it tastes remarkably like raw peas. YUM! Now that sounds like a lot of work to make a dish, but its fun for grazing while visiting the garden with friends:) And no side effects whatsoever!

    Cheers! And happy gardening!
    ~Heather-Lin

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